Sunday, March 12, 2017

Optics Can Distract


My mind wanders when I write.  As an example, I often think how the use of a word has changed.  I’ll come across a specific word, and the next thing I know I’ve been shot off on a tangent far from my writing project.   
Take the word “optics.”  It used to be defined as an area of physics involving the study of light.  I guess it still is, but it’s more frequently used to describe how something appears to an observer, as in, “The optics of the situation make them appear guilty.”
I believe the word has become popular in its new context because it allows the user to influence opinions without facts.  All you have to do is claim the optics support your position.  The word comes in handy in a country where politicians, media, and everyday Americans are engaging more frequently in debates where neither side presents sufficient facts.  What better way to win these disputes, or to cloud the discussions, than to state the optics support your views? 
When people don’t know what to believe, they usually believe what they want. We live in a world that is guided more and more by optics, opinion and ideology and less and less by facts. Opinions and polls seem to matter more than what is actually happening.  Indisputable facts bounce off of today’s ideologues like rain off a duck.
Benjamin Franklin gets credit for saying, “A man convinced against his will is of the same opinion still.”  The difference between Franklin’s 18th century and now is no one currently works very hard at convincing the other side.  Instead, it’s all about “rallying the base,” hanging around in “safe zones” where those with opposing views can’t speak out, and labeling instead of listening.
It could be that social media magnifies discord in the 21st century, but I can’t remember this country being so divided.  I hope we find a way to come together soon, but I must admit, the optics don’t look very good.
See what I mean?  Words distract me.  Well, I better get back to writing.     

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