Saturday, April 29, 2017

One-Star Reviews

Well, it finally happened.  I received my first one-star review for one of my books.  Being 18 words in length, it really didn’t qualify as a review.  Frankly, it struck me more as a protest sign than a review. 
 
I’ve received about 100 reviews posted to Amazon and Goodreads, so it’s not like this one-star rating would sneak by me.  I notice them all.  While 80% of my reviews are 4 and 5 star, I’m not new to receiving 3-star reviews.  I’ve even been able to cope with a couple 2-star appraisals, but for some reason this 1-star slap in the face was different.  It bothered me.
 
I’ve read blog posts from authors addressing the subject of one-star reviews, each offering advice on how best to absorb harsh ratings.  I agree with most of what they recommend:  Don’t respond to poor reviews. Don’t contact the reviewers.  Accept the criticism as “part of the territory” of being an author.  If possible, learn from the criticism.  There are exceptions to these recommendations.  If the attack on your work becomes repetitive, lacks constructive content, and/or appears to have destructive motivation, it’s reasonable to contact Goodreads and Amazon to alert them to the problem.
It’s human nature to be disappointed, even hurt, by these punitive reviews.  How could anyone be so critical of something you spent months, possibly years, creating?   The book (a short story collection) receiving my first one-star review had a 4.5-star average prior to this blemish.  It even received contest awards for several of the stories included in the collection.  Still, my first reaction to the one-star rating was to be hurt rather than angry.  
Another typical reaction is curiosity, wanting to know more about the person who would tell you your child is ugly.  Are they outside my intended audience?  Are they experienced reviewers? Could they have other motives for being so critical? As I said earlier, it’s not wise to contact the reviewer or to publically react in any way.  It might escalate the situation.  However, it’s not hard to learn more about an Amazon or Goodreads reviewer without contacting anyone.  There are few secrets on the Internet.
As an author, I have principles regarding giving and receiving reviews.  Every reader has the right to critique my books.  In fact, I welcome ALL reviews.  I also believe reviewers should provide constructive feedback and a reason for their rating, regardless of the number of stars.  I will never give an author an overly harsh critique of their book or one that doesn’t include a balance of positive and critical comments. I’ve posted 2 and 3 star-reviews, but I’ve offered constructive comments as to why the book didn’t meet my expectations.  I’ve yet to give another author a one-star review.  After all, who am I to levy such a punishing literary verdict? Instead, I’ll send her/him a private message with my comments.  
I wrote this blog post for a couple reasons.  For one, it helped me calm down and move on.  I also hope readers will better understand how important reviews are to authors.  We are just people, proud of our work.  We don’t anticipate that everyone will like what we produce, but we hope they’ll take time to let us know why or why not. 

Monday, April 24, 2017

Finding Motivation

Motivation is defined by Merriam-Webster as a force or influence that causes someone to do something.
 
Motivation is abstract.  It’s not something you can see or touch, and it’s different for everyone.    Speakers make a living selling it.  Drill sergeants instill it.  Some people wake up in the morning filled with it, while others never can seem to find it.  But one thing is for sure, writers need it. 
 
Many articles describe ways for writers to get motivated.  I’ve included a few at the end of this post.   Some of the tips in these articles work for me, but just as many don’t.  Here are ways I’ve found to get in the right frame of mind to write:
Switch Gears - My blog is called Thoughts, Stories, and Novels.  I post thoughts to my blog two or three times a month.  I’ve written dozens of short stories and maintain an inventory of ideas for the next one.  When I get bogged down on my current novel, I’ll switch gears for a day or two, diverting my attention to writing a blog post or possibly beginning a short story.   I find the diversity helps stimulate ideas.  
Brainstorm – If I’m stuck at a certain point in a novel or story, I’ll try breaking away from the manuscript and brainstorming.  I might jump to the conclusion and jot down ideas on how the book might end.   Sometimes I’ll go back to visit a particular character to see what improvements could be made.  Was I consistent in building the character? Could I make the character more compelling through dialogue and actions?  Other times, I pick a chapter in the book I thought was particularly exciting and well-written and re-read it, hoping to rediscover the motivation that helped produce it.
Find the Best Time of Day – Early morning (and I mean really early) is the best time for my mind to be clear and ready to produce my best writing.  There is something about getting an early jump on the day to make me feel more energized.  Other writers may produce better work at different times of the day.  The key is to know what time works best for you.
 
Hit the Trails – Exercise is a great way to shake the cobwebs loose.  For me, there’s no better exercise than hiking the mountain trails around our home.  An hour or two on the trails, and I’m usually in a better frame of mind to write.
 
Envision Success – Reading about aspiring writers who’ve found success is very motivational. Writer’s Digest is a good source for these articles, but there are several websites, blogs, and Facebook pages featuring authors who’ve broken through. 
 
Be Happy - It’s always easier to write when you’re in a good mood.   Take a break and do whatever makes you feel better.  Listen to uplifting music, play catch with your dog, or check out this YouTube video on motivation:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Sh5arV2cut0
  
These are just a few ideas that work for me.  I’m sure you have others.  I’d be interested in hearing them.

 
http://www.writersdigest.com/writing-articles/by-writing-goal/improve-my-writing/9-ways-to-get-started-and-stay-motivated

Wednesday, April 12, 2017

Do Authors Peak?

Whether it’s your career, athletic capabilities, sexual proficiency or anything else with a start, middle and an end, reaching your peak sucks.  Most don’t realize they’ve peaked because they’re too busy enjoying their view at the summit.   But when the slide down the backside begins, they know it, and there’s little to be done.
 
Being a baby boomer, I know it’s vogue to hype the advantages of aging.  I’m sure you’ve heard the “60 is the new 40” mantra coming from an ever-greying population.   I even wrote a novel, “Better Late Than Ever,” where residents of a futuristic retirement community become fixated on regaining their youth.   But the older I get, the more I accept that I will never be 25 again, or even 45.  Medical advances have enabled us to live longer and have made it easier to age, but these advances have yet to reverse the process.  Today, I hit a golf ball as far as I ever will.  I ran my last six-minute mile 30 years ago.  High school was the last time I’ll ever take to the basketball court in front of cheering crowds.  And I knew long before Bruce Springsteen that “Glory Days” will pass you by in the wink of a young girl’s eye.  
 
Peaking is more noticeable in some careers than others. Most professional athletes plateau before reaching 40.  Even in golf, a game many play ‘til they die, no professional player has won a major championship past age 46.  In business, corporate executives reach full stride in their 50s and early 60s, but the race to the top narrows dramatically for advancement-minded managers in their mid-40s.  By that age, if you’ve yet to be identified as executive material, you have likely begun a slow glide pattern back to earth.
 
Still, not everyone peaks by their mid-40s.  There’s good news for authors and others using their mind to make a living.  Studies (1, 2) have shown the more you exercise your brain, the longer your cognitive skills remain.  It turns out that learning and brain development can be a life-long process.  For writers, the message is to keep writing.  Staying healthy and physically fit also play a major role in these studies, so a long walk every day is advisable.  I find this news encouraging given I started my writing avocation in my mid-50s.  
 
There are many successful authors who didn’t publish their first book until later in life (3).  Laura Ingalls Wilder published “Little House in the Big Woods” at age 64, and then went on to write others in the series.  Earnest Hemingway was most prolific in his 20s and 30s, the period when he wrote “A Farewell to Arms.” It was generally accepted by critics that Hemingway was washed up by the time he reached 50.  Not so.  He wrote and published “Old Man and the Sea” at age 53.   Had he not suffered long-term injuries from plane crashes later in his life, who knows how many more Hemingway novels we would be enjoying?
 
I, and other aspiring writers like me, may never become bestselling authors, but as long we keep testing ourselves, we can enjoy the long uphill climb.  Who knows?  Our glory days may still lie ahead.